Malaysia – The closing of the Malay mind


The closing of the Malay mind

By Dennis Ignatius, dennisignatius.com

In his 1987 book, ‘The closing of the American mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students’, Allan Bloom, an American political philosopher, argued that the social/political crisis of 20th-century America was really an intellectual crisis resulting from an education system that rendered students incapable of critical thinking.

Given the statements emanating from the recent ‘Rise of the Ummah Convention’, one has to wonder if something similar might be going on here as well.

Have decades of politico-religious indoctrination led to the closing of the Malay-Muslim mind, diminishing their self-confidence and making it difficult for them to arrive at a realistic appreciation of the world they inhabit?

Are we, in fact, witnessing an intellectual and emotional retreat into a dark world of self-created fantasies and fears straight out of some ‘wayang kulit’ show?

The dominant narrative

Listening in on the very public discourse within significant segments of the Malay community, it appears that racial and religious issues have overtaken everything else to become the dominant narrative. Their whole world seems to have been reduced to something of an existential racial and religious struggle for survival against a plethora of enemies of their own making.

This shift in mindset is finding expression in a number of different ways. For one thing, we are seeing a rising tide of segregationist ideas including Muslims-only laundrettes, barbershops and photo-studios. As well, there is growing acceptance of the idea that it is haram to wish others for Christmas, Diwali or Chinese New Year, attend functions in non-Malay/non-Muslim homes or even to vote for non-Muslims.

The underlying presumption, though unspoken, is that non-Muslims and non-Malays are somehow unclean, that their very presence is defiling and challenging to the Malay-Muslim sense of identity and that good Malays/Muslims ought to have as little to do with non-Malays as possible.

The animus towards non-Malays has reached such intensity that even the pathetically few senior positions held by non-Malays in public service attracts controversy. Have we gone from aspiring for a public service reflective of our diversity to one where even the few non-Malays in high office are a few too many?

And, by insisting that Islam does not permit non-Malays to hold senior positions in a Muslim-majority polity, PAS president Hadi Awang has conveniently provided a theological justification for institutionalizing discrimination against non-Muslims.

At the same time, we have government-affiliated think tanks and educational institutions regularly obsessing about cataclysmic threats to Islam from imaginary groups. Christians, in particular, are vilified and even their prayers for a better nation are considered subversive and disrespectful. The crusades ended in 1291 but apparently some have not yet received the memo.

The underlying sense of insecurity also extends to culture. Traditional Malay culture, with its rich infusion of Asian influences, for example, is now considered something of an embarrassment and is downplayed or denied while Arab culture is considered superior and extolled. In the process, key elements of Malay culture – dress, dance, art and custom – are being jettisoned in favour of the desert culture of Bedouins.

Surely, if there is a battle worth fighting, it is the battle to preserve Malay culture and its unique contribution to civilization.

And now we have clerics like Ismail Mina Ahmad attempting to rewrite non-Malays out of the history of our nation while educators like Datuk Raof Husin insist that even the meagre scholarships that non-Malays presently receive should be withdrawn on the spurious grounds that it is unconstitutional. Do they ever listen to themselves? What kind of a nation considers it okay to be so spiteful and discriminatory against its own citizens?

It is, I suppose, the next step in the evolution of the “pendatang” construct with minorities cast as interloping, unpatriotic, scheming idolaters who deserve nothing but contempt for daring to consider themselves Malaysian with equal rights and privileges.

Not by accident

Of course, all this is not happening by accident; it is, rather, the result of a well-orchestrated though ultimately destructive strategy by UMNO deep-state (with the tacit support of PAS) to reshape and refocus the Malay-Muslim mind. The objective is to ensure the party’s own survival by diverting attention from scandal and failure to imaginary threats that the party itself has invented.

And they have been so successful at this game that a wide cross-section of Malay-Muslim society has now bought into their narrative, making it the dominant framework through which everything else is viewed. When even university professors start unthinkingly regurgitating this fabricated and bizarre narrative, the stage is set for intellectual, cultural and religious conformity and rigidity – groupthink on a national scale replete with dysfunctional decision-making, the suppression of dissenting views and isolationist tendencies.

As many observers have rightly noted, race and religion have been weaponized and employed to keep Malay-Muslims subservient and non-Malays on the defensive. In the process, UMNO has condemned all Malaysians – Malay and non-Malay, Muslim and non-Muslim – to forever run on the treadmill of an existential struggle for survival against each other while leaving the party to do as it pleases.

Descent into absurdity

And so, at a time when our nation is faced with serious and very real problems from corruption and the plunder of national resources, institutional decay and the abuse of power, we have groups worrying about who should cut their hair or wash their clothes or take their photographs.

At a time when the real enemies of our nation are destroying it, we have no shortage of pseudo-nationalists ready to do battle against minorities, deviants, gays, liberals, atheists and, of course, Jews and Christians.

At a time when we are confronted with serious social problems, youth unemployment and falling living standards, we have people arguing about who is best qualified to carry out amputations for theft or proper procedures to ascertain the gender of men or women who might fall short of some airhead’s idea of what they should look like.

At a time when even Saudi Arabia wants to return to moderate Islam, we have zealots blindly pushing the nation towards an extremism that has proven so destructive elsewhere.

Such is the extent of the lunacy that has descended upon the nation.

Zenith of power, abyss of insecurity

Ironically, this shift in mindset is happening at a time when Malay power has reached a zenith unparalleled in history, and Islam itself more firmly entrenched and accepted than at any time since it first came to the country in the 12th century, courtesy of traders from India.

As well, one would have thought that some 60 years after independence, after more than 40 years of Bumiputraism, after securing near total dominance of the nation’s political and economic structures, the armed forces, the civil service and academia, and with the steadily declining non-Malay demographic, Malays would at least feel more confident and secure.

Instead, thanks to UMNO, a siege mentality has descended over a large segment of the Malay community making them fearful and resentful, bigoted and unsure of themselves. As well, it is obliging them to retreat behind self-defeating walls that will render them less able to compete and hold their own in a rapidly changing world. If they cannot be secure and confident within the narrow confines of a small multi-ethnic polity, how will they compete in a borderless world that respects neither race nor religion?

It is, in many ways, the ultimate betrayal.

Battle for the Malay mind

To be sure, the struggle for the Malay-Muslim mind is far from over.

Alarmed by the emerging ethos, the slow extinction of Malay culture and the rising tide of intolerance, the Malay rulers, the ultimate custodians of Malay religion, culture and identity, are speaking out like never before, and in uncharacteristically strong terms.

A number of Malay groups and individuals have also risen to challenge the UMNO-inspired narrative. G25, the Patriots Association, PAGE and Islamic Renaissance Front, to name a few, have been outspoken opponents of bigotry and racism while championing an alternative vision of a Malay community at peace with itself, confident of its place in the world, open and tolerant.

They are about the only bright spot in an otherwise gloomy picture, and upon their success will rest the future not just of the Malays but of all Malaysians.


By permission from Dennis Ignatius

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Malaysia – Its The Army Veterans Who May Well Save Their Beloved Country


merahza (51) in veterans

The patriots are a special breed of men who serve their beloved country through thick and thin when they were young and continue to do so in their twilight years.

They have taken the solemn oath risking their lives to defend the motherland and her people.

Sadly they are the neglected and unappreciated lot because they play their role without any fanfare and leave quietly after the job is done.

“Old soldiers never die, they simply fade away” – General Douglas MacArthur

True to the spirit of patriotism, here in Malaysia the patriots rise to the occasion to save their beloved country which is currently crumbling from the misconducts and misadventures of corrupted politicians.

IN SHARP SLAP TO NAJIB’S FACE, ARMY VETERANS WANT GOVT TO FORM SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO MANAGE 1MDB

PETALING JAYA – National Patriots Association (Patriots) president Brigadier-General (Rtd) Mohamed Arshad Raji has called for a special committee to be formed to deal with the issue of debts pertaining to 1MDB.

The retired army man said that the Yang DiPertuan Agong and the Council of Rulers should step in to appoint such a committee.

Arshad cited a Singapore’s Straits Times report on Tuesday, headlined “Malaysia’s 1MDB settles debt owed to Abu Dhabi with China backing”, as the rationale for his suggestion, as he said the issue “could not be left to the government alone”.

“ST had reported that the US$602.7 million (RM2.4 billion) the state-owned company paid to Abu Dhabi’s International Petroleum Investment Company (IPIC), were from funds made available by divesting its stake in two companies to buyers linked to China state-owned enterprises,” he said.

The amount was the second instalment of a US$1.2 billion debt which was due by the end of this year.

“The decision to settle this outstanding debt cannot be left to our government alone, as it has proven itself with a trust deficit.

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At the end of the day, no one else, not even the (useless) politicians in the opposition could bring any meaningful change, but the patriots.

 

Source:- Malaysian Chronicle

Related read:

‘Evil’ politicians are dividing us, says veterans group

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Originally posted @ Steemit

Singapore Premier Puts Malaysia To Shame


South China Morning Post

1MDB VS 38 OXLEY ROAD: WHY MALAYSIA ENVIES SINGAPORE

The family feud dominating public life in Singapore has crossed the Causeway, as Malaysians marvel at the Lion City premier’s open handling of the saga – and compare it to the closed-door approach of their own leader, Najib Razak, regarding his alleged links to a scandal at the state investment fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB).

Singapore’s prime minister, Lee Hsien Loong, has won widespread praise for his handling of what many believe should have been kept a private family matter. His siblings have accused him of abusing his power as prime minister to overrule the wishes of their late father – the city state’s founding leader Lee Kuan Yew – regarding the fate of the family home at 38 Oxley Road. They say their father was adamant in wanting the home to be demolished after his death, but that the premier wants to go against this wish to preserve the home and derive political capital from their father’s legacy.

Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong speaks in parliament about his family’s dispute over the fate of his late father’s home at 38 Oxley Road. Photo: AFP

The Lion City premier has responded with openness. Not only did he make a statement on national television – saying he had done all he could to resolve the family conflict and apologising for any harm it may have done to Singapore’s reputation – he also gave MPs a free rein to grill him in parliament.

Najib, on the other hand, has remained largely silent regarding a scandal at the state investment fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) – where investigators claim to have traced some US$700 million wired into his accounts. Najib, who has denied any wrongdoing, is accused by critics of trying to shut down debate on the scandal. He has banned parliament from mentioning 1MDB and has removed key figures from his cabinet after they spoke out about the issue.

“The Singaporean PM has asked forgiveness from the people because of his siblings fighting. The Malaysian PM robbed billions, cricket noises,” said Twitter user @normgn. “Find it amusing to see the level of response of Singapore towards the Oxley Road house versus here for 1MDB. Just so weird,” said another, @yoongkhean. “One side got parliament seating just to explain it, one side … ignorance is bliss.”

The contrasting approach of the two leaders has been made more obvious as new details emerge about the US Department of Justice’s investigation into 1MDB.

As the public digest the details of the saga in the usually scandal-free Singapore – which has included Facebook posts from the premier’s family and private emails made public – they are also poring over the latest details of the Department of Justice’s investigation into 1MDB. The latest filing in the case seeks to recover US$540 million in assets including a yacht, a Picasso painting gifted to Leonardo DiCaprio, and a diamond necklace purchased with money stolen from the government fund.

Department of Justice documents allege that nearly US$30 million stolen from the fund were used to buy jewellery for the wife of “Malaysian Official 1” – jewellery that is said to have included a 22-carat pink diamond necklace. The documents do not identify Najib or his wife Rosmah Mansor by name, but say the jewellery was for the wife of “Malaysian Official 1”. Cabinet minister Abdul Rahman Dahlan has identified Malaysian Official 1 as Najib.

A cartoon by Zunar depicts an Inspector Clouseau-esque character. Handout photo

Controversial political cartoonist Zunar responded to this revelation by drawing a picture of a witch with a beehive hairdo riding a 1MDB broomstick and waving a large pink diamond pendant. Another cartoon depicts an Inspector Clouseau-esque character, a reference to the pink panther and a large pink diamond.

Last month, Rosmah’s solicitor released a statement saying that her lawyers were closely monitoring all postings on social media platforms and other publications, cautioning the public from making any false and malicious postings and statements.

In June, model Miranda Kerr turned over jewellery worth US$8.1 million that had been given to her by Malaysian financier Jho Low, who was instrumental in the development of 1MDB.

Australian model Miranda Kerr turned over jewellery given to her by Jho Low worth more than US$8.1 million. Photo: AFP

Even opposition politicians have taken to social media to vent their frustration at the lack of debate surrounding 1MDB. Member of Parliament M. Kulasegaran tweeted: “Openness by Singapore PM on a controversial issue speaks well of a government. In Malaysia?”

And Speaker of the Selangor State Assembly Hannah Yeoh said on Facebook: “When a controversy happens of this nature, being answerable to parliament is the right response. Lee Hsien Loong, you’re a good PM & I hope 1MDB can be dealt with like this in the Malaysian parliament too. Truly, not every son of a former prime minister is the same.”

WATCH: Singapore PM says siblings’ charges ‘baseless’

 

Najib is the son of Malaysia’s second prime minister, Abdul Razak Hussein.

Lawyer Ong Yu Jian also shared Lee’s public address on Facebook, saying: “No matter how embarrassing or personal the issue, he has the b**** to air it in parliament, invite questions from MPs and ask the party whip to be lifted for this issue.”

Political analyst Oh Ei Sun of the Pacific Research Centre said Najib’s silence was because he was confident he had the support of voters ahead of an election that may be called as early as this year.

38 Oxley Road, the residence of Singapore’s first prime minister, the late Lee Kuan Yew. Photo: EPA

“At end of the day, the 1MDB scandal will not significantly affect the vote banks for the ruling coalition, the Barisan Nasional, or even his party Umno specifically.

“Najib relies primarily on the urban and rural poor and for these people 1MDB is almost a soap opera. They may follow it but don’t feel acute hatred towards Najib as do the first group of people. They are more interested in whether they get a share in the next handout as they depend on these handouts. They won’t stop voting for the Barisan Nasional because of 1MDB. ”

Oh also said that there was less need to clarify issues in Malaysia, as Singaporean voters were “more sophisticated and educated”.

Still, many Malaysian voters and lawmakers are frustrated at what they see as a clampdown on discussion of the 1MDB scandal.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak can avoid discussing the 1MDB scandal because he is confident of voter support in an upcoming election, analysts say. Photo: EPA

Opposition MP Steven Sim said parliament was not even allowed to mention it on the pretext that it was subjudice. “Despite investigators in at least six countries investigating and taking legal action against 1MDB-related parties, including the US Department of Justice, Najib’s government has not only removed key leaders in his cabinet and in civil service who spoke out against him on this issue – notably his deputy prime minister, second finance minister, the attorney general, and the head of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission – parliament is not allowed to even mention 1MDB.

“By allowing serious and damaging allegations to be openly debated in parliament, Lee Hsien Loong demonstrated he has nothing to hide, is willing to come clean and answer to the people,” Sim said.

“The same cannot be said of Najib Razak.” 

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Malaysia – The second corporate raid


It was not the British government that seized Malaya, but a private company, run by an unstable sociopath

EIClogo

People still talk about the British conquering Malaya, but that phrase disguises a more sinister reality. It was not the British government that seized Malaya at the end of the 18th century, but a dangerously unregulated private company headquartered in one small office, five windows wide, in London, and managed in India by an unstable sociopath – Clive.

clive

Robert Clive, was an unstable sociopath who led the fearsome East India Company to its conquest of the subcontinent. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The first corporate raid.

In 1511, Melaka was conquered by Portugal, after which it was taken by the Dutch in 1641. In 1786, the British Empire established a presence in Malaya, when the Sultan of Kedah leased Penang Island to the British East India Company. The British obtained the town of Singapore in 1819, and in 1824 took control of Melaka following the Anglo-Dutch Treaty. By 1826, the British directly controlled Penang, Melaka, Singapore, and the island of Labuan, which they established as the crown colony of the Straits Settlements. By the 20th century, the states of Pahang, Selangor, Perak, and Negeri Sembilan, known together as the Federated Malay States, had British residents appointed to advise the Malay rulers, to whom the rulers were bound to defer to by treaty. The remaining five states in the peninsula, known as the Unfederated Malay States, while not directly under British rule, also accepted British advisers around the turn of the 20th century. Development on the peninsula and Borneo were generally separate until the 19th century. Under British rule the immigration of Chinese and Indians to serve as labourers was encouraged. The area that is now Sabah came under British control as North Borneo when both the Sultan of Brunei and the Sultan of Sulu transferred their respective territorial rights of ownership, between 1877 and 1878. In 1842, Sarawak was ceded by the Sultan of Brunei to James Brooke, whose successors ruled as the White Rajahs over an independent kingdom until 1946, when it became a crown colony.

On 31 August 1957, Malaya became an independent member of the Commonwealth of Nations.

After this a plan was put in place to federate Malaya with the crown colonies of North Borneo (which joined as Sabah), Sarawak, and Singapore. The date of federation was planned to be 31 August 1963 so as to coincide with the anniversary of Malayan independence; however, federation was delayed until 16 September 1963 in order for a United Nations survey of support for federation in Sabah and Sarawak, called for by parties opposed to federation including Indonesia‘s Sukarno and the Sarawak United Peoples’ Party, to be completed – Wiki

Just like any sovereign state, Malaysia trotted on to progress and prosperity independently, with all the ups and downs for six decades under six prime ministers.

Currently, this relatively young nation is going through rough seas. The captain of the ship has (literally) lost his bearings, and the vessel is heading towards a iceberg, a collision of an enormous proportion, which will make the Titanic look pale in comparison.

Malaysia is in turmoil, politically and economically. The local currency Ringgit has dropped to a twelve year low and is in a free fall position. The political situation is in a state of disrepair as the ruling party UMNO under the leadership of prime minister Najib is losing popularity by the minute even as we speak.

Corruption is rampant in the government and UMNO, and it starts right from the highest echelon cascading down to the clerks in every ministry and department of the civil service.  Many arrests have been conducted by the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC)

Malaysia scored 49 points out of 100 on the 2016 Corruption Perceptions Index reported by Transparency International. Corruption Index in Malaysia averaged 49.73 Points from 1995 until 2016, reaching an all time high of 53.20 Points in 1996 and a record low of 43 Points in 2011.

The country’s reputation dived head down internationally as the infamous 1MDB scandals were blown out of the pandora’s box. Billions of dollars went ‘missing‘ into the pockets of rouges closely connected to the PM, while some RM2.6b were trailed into the PM’s personal account.

1mdb

The massive amount of debts by 1MDB triggered investigations and several law suits by authorities and creditors in United States, Switzerland, Dubai, Singapore and Hong Kong.

Najib will hope that a friendly figure in the White House will help his chances in the biggest kleptocracy case brought by the US justice department to date. It’s seeking $1 billion in assets that it says are tied to “public corruption and a global money laundering conspiracy.” – Quartz

The second corporate raid

communistmalaisie2

Many mega projects have been interrupted or halted as these projects are in financial rout and seeking bail-outs or sourced out to foreign financiers. The biggest and main taker is China.

The Finance Minis­try (MoF) has called off a deal to sell 60% of Bandar Malaysia – a mega property development project estimated to have a gross development value of RM160bil when completed in 20 years – has sent shockwaves through the country and the region – TheStarOnLine

Proton the first Malaysian car is up for sale and the Chinese automaker Geely is a promising buyer.

Even the Bilderberg Shell have sold their refinery in Port Dickson to a Chinese company Hengyuan International Ltd.

Chinese presence in the ailing Malaysian economy are seen as bailing out Najib’s misadventures and not as genuine investments.

Playing the domestic cards by opening its borders to China’s investment and development projects – many of which have shown traces of fatigue in the long run – Najib brought the Chinese government to understand that he needed them for his own political survival. – TheIndependent

Here are some national mega projects where the Chinese are literally and desperately begged to participate by Najib to restore his unpopularity, saving his neck and retain power all at the same time:

What comes with all these Chinese participations (interventions) and financing? One has to be too naive to think that its all purely business investments on the part of the Chinese and that Malaysia is just so good and fortunate to attract foreign investments, but silly enough to offer opportunities to foreigners, especially China as giveaways whilst herself missing the chance to reap fortunes from her own viable, profit making projects?

Desperate times call for desperate measures, even if it means selling one’s own mother to save one’s own neck. This is a more accurate observation by concerned Malaysians and that history is beginning to repeat itself is glaringly apparent.

The British East India Company came in a quite different time, scenario and circumstances as the corporate raid was done singularly and stealthily during a time and period the people were innocent simpletons, unsuspecting and unaware of what was going on until it was too late to do anything to stop the marauders… and the rest, as they say is history.

For a century, the East India Company conquered, subjugated and plundered vast tracts of south Asia. It was the original corporate raider. The lessons of its brutal reign have never been more relevant.

With that unforgettable episode of Malaya (then) in the back of the people’s heads, Malaysians are witnessing, with their eyes wide open this time history repeating itself.

Malaysians lowered the Union Jack on August 31, 1957 to regain their freedom, and sixty years later, will they be seeing the raising of another corporate flag – the Five Stars Red flag and be slaves all over again? One must remember, most of the big Chinese corporations are controlled and owned by the State. Only this time it will be a communist takeover instead of the capitalist fascists and oh, how paradoxical it has turned out, as the people of Malaya had fought so hard with their lives to rid off the communist terrorists (which were supported and backed by China), during the Emergency period.

What else will be sold to complete the corporate raid? Highways, water, power, utilities public transport and telecommunication services next? Will the people knowingly sit back and allow a second corporate raid this time around?

 

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Malaysia – Controlling the majority via the minority


It is an open book that Malaysia is in essence ruled by the Malay elites. The ruling coalition Barisan National (formerly The Alliance Party) is led by UMNO.

If the Malays (Muslims) are the majority, why the need for a coalition with the non-Malays?

Back to the pre-independence days, the Colonial masters insisted that for Malaya to be self-governed under their proposed ‘democratic’ two-third majority system, the population of the Malays then were insufficient to obtain such majority. The Malays constituted only about fifty-one percent of the population and therefore could not form a ruling government.

Under the circumstances, the Malays led by Tunku Abdul Rahman had no choice, but to work around cooperating with the Chinese and Indians to achieve independence. The details of a political coalition were soon worked out and somehow an agreement was reached between them that Malays will have the upper hand in most if not all matters in the ruling of the country. The rest, as they say, is history.

malaydilemmaSix decades down the road, the Malays are still on top of things politically, but not quite economically. This’ a perennial scenario and somehow the Malays are never good enough at anything commerce. The failure of UMNO to address and solve this has become a Malay conundrum and Mahathir, the 4th Prime Minister of Malaysia in his The Malay Dilemma, expounded the predicament of the Malays in their own country.

Matters got worse for the Malays now and have disunited through the years when the greedy Malay elites in UMNO selfishly only work on their own well-being and accumulated riches for themselves. Under the current scenario, the 1MDB scandals have exposed the culprits in UMNO for what and who they really are and thus have weakened the UMNO hegemony. UMNO is collapsing under the ill-gotten wealth of the corrupt elites and this realization has turned these unscrupulous and corrupt beings desperate to hang on to their power and to keep their loot as well.

Now it is ‘desperate measures for desperate times’.

Holding the trump card of religion, the elites are deploying Islam as the modus operandi in their battle for retaining the status quo. Religion is and has always played an effective device in a multi-racial multi-religious population and has proven to garner support for the employer when the political failed. A Muslim will side a Muslim regardless of his politics. The latest ploy of the falling elites is lending their support to the opposition Islamic party PAS in the tabling in Parliament of the RUU355 Bill.

Religious issues are steadily and daily reported in the elites’ controlled local “Fake News” media and most if not all are about the upholding and defending of Islam against ‘attacks‘ by non-Muslim Malaysians, and especially the opposition Democratic Action Party (DAP).

The unsuspecting Malaysians both Malays and the non-Malays see the ongoing as purely a religious issue and a serious one at that. Some watchful citizens see it for what it really is, but most do not. This is a clever ploy by the elites to garner support from the fragmented Malays who are Muslims by birth.

The non-Malays non-Muslims were, are and never will be a threat to the Malays. The 13 May 69 racial riots were a false-flag event staged by the Malay elites in cohort with the international elites in the likes of the Rothschilds.

Malaysians are fully aware and always reminded of this incident and are conscious enough to not let its repeat.

The international world community is even fazed by this tactic and see it as a discrimination on the minority:

Muslim NGO: It is Malays who are discriminated against

In refuting the findings of a report by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), Centhra chief executive officer Azril Mohd Amin said minorities in Malaysia do not suffer any religious discrimination. – FMT

In truth, it is the majority Malays who are discriminated upon in many and every way for the sole purpose to control them. The Malays being Muslims are restricted in every aspect of their daily lives. Unconsciously the religious mind control has affected them to be unsuccessful commercially and economically,  being unable to compete with their non-Muslim compatriots who are not bogged down with religious dogmas.

Fear is deployed on the Malays and in tandem with religion forms a very effective method of control:

Malay leaders instill fear and a siege mentallity in Malays

Former Deputy Prime Minister declares he’s a “liberal” and 
very proud of it in supporting the Group of 25.

“They are also instilling a very serious inferiority complex among the Malays. This is misplaced,” added Musa. “So many Malays are capable, yet every day these groups are saying ‘You are inferior, you need protection’ and ‘Those superior people are attacking or threatening us’.”PTM

The old worn out method of ‘Divide and Control‘ is still effective to some degree. The elites are not creative and that’s all they have up their sleeves. The winds of change is ongoing and people are waking up. The elites are desperate to the growing ‘populism’ movement all over the world.

Malaysians must rise quickly and unite. The old ‘majority versus minority‘, or ‘we v. them‘ way of thinking must be thrown out the window as it is only a polariztion method for control.

Malays must wake up that UMNO has done nothing for them for the past six decades. The threats are from within them. Malays are their own worst enemy.

That’s the real Malay dilemma.

Controlling the majority via the minority is dangerous to the Malays and to the very survival of the non-Malays. It is highly detrimental to the nation.

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Is Malaysia in the Saudi-Yemen War?


FMT

‘Why are we entangled in Saudi-led war?’

Retired brigadier-general fears threat to Malaysia’s security.

KUALA LUMPUR: A retired brigadier-general has called for a review of the government’s decision to deploy Malaysian soldiers to Saudi Arabia, saying it could have repercussions on Malaysia’s security.

Speaking to FMT, Mohd Arshad Raji, who last served as the Royal Malaysian Army’s Chief of Staff for Field Headquarters, said he feared that Malaysia’s involvement in the Saudi-led military campaign against Yemen could provoke reactions from elements disagreeing with the campaign.

“When it comes to the involvement of our military overseas, we have to be cautious,” he said. “If it’s for humanitarian reasons and peacekeeping missions, then it’s fine. But I’m at a loss as to why we are sending people to that side of the world. I think we have enough problems in our own region.”

The campaign stretches back to March 2015 with the Saudis backing of Yemen President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi against Houthi rebels, who seized the Yemeni capital of Sanaa and other parts of the country.

The Saudi-led coalition includes Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates with some support from Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Sudan. But a recent United Nations report said the United States was offering logistical support and intelligence activities and that officers from Britain, France and Malaysia were also working at the coalition’s headquarters in Riyadh.

Arshad said Malaysia should follow the example of Britain when it came to the deployment of troops.

He noted that any proposal to deploy British troops to other countries would be debated in parliament so that the public would be in the know.

“A soldier is someone’s son or father or brother,” he said. “The public has a right to know where we are sending our soldiers and why.”

Recently, in the wake of the UN report, Parti Amanah Negara told Putrajaya to come clean on whether Malaysia had joined the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen.

The Defence Ministry is on record as having denied that Malaysian troops were involved, describing the allegations as baseless and slanderous.

The ministry said Malaysian soldiers had been sent to Saudi Arabia to prepare them for duties they might need to undertake, such as moving Malaysians out of Yemen if the need arose.

It added that the armed forces had been invited by Saudi Arabia to take part in its Northern Thunder military exercise, which was meant to foster unity among Muslim countries, not focus on military operations in Yemen.

 

http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2017/03/07/amanah-clarify-malaysias-involvement-in-yemen-war/

Related

Minister says global media, UN wrong on military’s role in Yemen

The official BN government stand is whatever the rest of the world reports are lies and whatever BN says is the absolute truth,… Read more

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Malaysia’s criminal state of mind


NewMandala

Manjit Bhatia

Malaysian PM Najib Razak is using the assassination of Kim Jong-nam to deflect heat from ongoing scandal and economic slowdown ahead of scheduled elections, writes Manjit Bhatia.

It’s comical when Malaysia’s deputy prime minister Zahid Hamidi demands that criminals backed by North Korea, China’s client rogue state, respect the “sovereignty” of his country’s laws. As home minister in 2013, Zahid had lavished praise on Tiga Line, the outlawed Malay gangsters. He also called on police to “shoot first” if non-Malay thugs threaten or kill his fellow Malays.

Meanwhile, police chief Khalid Abu Bakar requested the same abominable Pyongyang “authorities” to extradite suspects in Kim Jong-nam’s assassination at Kuala Lumpur’s budget carrier airport on 13 February. Khalid’s lightning-fast move here isn’t surprising, seeking fame and kudos. Yet, when it comes to netting official corruption’s big fish, including corporate leaders, and independently investigating prime minister Najib Razak, he disinclines at every turn.

Strictly speaking, Malaysia has not a single independent institution. Instead, patron-client relations rule. Others call it patronage. Simple example: Khalid is subservient to Zahid who is subservient to Najib who holds Malaysia’s purse-strings as finance minister. This buys him allegiance and serious protection in a country racked by state-ordained corruption, cronyism and some of the worst forms of racism. What has this to do with the Jong-nam case? Everything. And just as well — Malaysia-North Korea diplomatic ties are flexing for bust-up.    

As baffling as the assassination was, it couldn’t have happened sooner. Malaysian elections are due mid-2018. Zahid and Khalid, like Najib, are hoping the matter of the half-brother of North Korea’s insane leader Kim Jong-un will grip Malaysians like a John Le Carre thriller. The state-controlled media is acting to orders of ensuring the case is lead news, 24/7. After all, Malaysians need distractions. Being a Muslim country — not an Islamic state — the visit of the king of Saudi Arabia this week has somewhat displaced the Jong-nam as the lead story, albeit temporarily.   

Interestingly, the North Korean ambassador has had unprecedented scope in seen to attempt to interfere in police investigations. Also curiously, Malaysian officials didn’t refute the ambassador’s claim that South Korea and Malaysia were in cahoots, ostensibly to bring down the Jong-un dynastic regime. But when news outlets ran stories of a North Korean spy network operating in Malaysia, the episode moved from the bizarre to the whacky. Still, that’s exactly what Najib needs.

Problem is, the Jong-nam murder hasn’t absorbed Malaysians. They’re far more worried about their jobs future. Some factories have closed down; some others are moving offshore, to Vietnam, Burma and Bangladesh. The old ways of enticing foreign firms, via tax and other incentives, no longer work. These days China demands 99-year leases among its preconditions of investing in Malaysia. Like Singapore, Malaysia is struggling to establish anew its global competitiveness. For over a decade the international division of labor has shifted away from Asia’s first and second-tier ‘miracle economies’. 

Nonetheless, Najib boasts a high economic growth rate for the country. At 4.2 per cent GDP for 2016, it is significantly lower than 5 per cent in 2015. Between 2000 to 2016, average GDP has been 4.73 per cent. The jobs outlook is even bleaker. Official statistics put unemployment averaging 3 per cent; last year it climbed to 3.6 per cent, with 3.5 per cent in 2015. Most credible economists, even the market type,  know Malaysia’s official numbers are as rubbery as North Korea’s or China’s.

There’s no data for job participation rate in Malaysia. Yet it makes a better unemployment indicator, regardless or perhaps especially given the Najib regime’s propensity to embellish everything, including statistics. There’s sufficient anecdotal evidence to suggest joblessness is far higher among Malays and Indians, the groups increasingly engaged in crime. There’s also extensive under-employment among Malays, Chinese and Indians. And Malaysians are struggling on a single income, where the ‘minimum’ monthly wage of MYR900 ($US200) is scarcely enforced.

Exacerbating Malaysians’ worries is inflation. At 3.2 per cent, it spiked after the introduction of a consumption tax. In Kuala Lumpur alone, credible estimates put inflation at least twice the “official” number. At 6 per cent GST, Malaysia was never ready for it, in the structural sense. Add the measly value of the Malaysian ringgit, inflation hits close to double-digits, in real terms, according to some investment banks’ research. Meanwhile, Najib will maintain taxpayer-funded personal income subsidies, mostly for the Malays, and he’ll boost ‘free money’ ahead of next year’s polls.

If Bank Negara, the central bank, isn’t manipulating the low currency, then it’s a ‘market godsend’ for this heavily export-dependent, natural resource-based economy. Yet after two years of the collapsing ringgit, Malaysia’s competitiveness hasn’t improved. Its budget deficit and national debt are ballooning. Najib is banking on a commodities boom as the manufacturing base is routed by global forces. Take the long-failed local auto industry: Proton is effectively sold off to cheap China money. Selling the farm is the last resort of a scoundrel. But don’t expect Najib to sell the family jewels.

Blockbusting official corruption remains front and centre in Malaysian minds. Najib’s sudden great wealth humiliates Malays and irks the others. Nobody believe a rich Saudi or the Saudi state had “donated” $US1.4 billion to Najib; almost everyone, including the Malays, believe it was siphoned from bankrupt state firm 1MDB – brainchild of its chairman, Najib. And those proceeds miraculously wound up in Najib’s personal bank accounts.

The 2018 polls should humiliate Najib but it won’t defeat him or the ruling UMNO party. Many Malays feel especially aggrieved at how easily the ruling class has enriched itself while Malay villagers eke out a meagre living from plots of land Najib has ‘given’ them. No similar generosity has been extended to non-Malays. Some Malays agree this is unfair; most, however, subscribe to Machiavellian politics. But it’s Malaysia’s banal inter-racial harmony that’ll suffer the more as a consequence.

The Jong-nam case is serious — on legal paper. His killing hasn’t caused Beijing’s eunuchs a twitch. But Najib is using the assassination to his own political ends. It’s what dastardly regimes or political leaders in trouble or on the people’s noses would do — exploit an awful criminal matter to cement their illegitimate and immoral positions.    

 

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